Foreign workers in Lincolnshire urged to ‘be prepared’ for Brexit impact

Brexit
Brexit

The Head of Immigration at a leading chain of Lincolnshire solicitors has urged foreign nationals to ‘be aware and be prepared’ as Brexit threatens to impact the right of residence for many foreign national workers.

Figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed that between 2006 and 2016, population growth in Lincolnshire was recorded at 57,999, with 30,568 due to immigration - a total of 52.7 per cent.

With Brexit looming on the horizon, Louis Harman from Chattertons Solicitors, is steeling himself for an increased workload as concerns grow over the validity of many migrant workers’ rights to remain in the UK.

Louis, who specialises in matters of immigration and nationality law, said: “Immigration law is fast-changing, complex and pervades almost all aspects of law – particularly affecting families, business owners, HR professionals and residential landlords.

“No matter what situation a client finds themselves in, my first piece of advice would always be the same - ‘be aware and be prepared’.

“Clients should always know the full spectrum of options available to them, along with the risks and advantages of each, so that they can make informed decisions that suit their circumstances. With Brexit, this is even more important. Action can be taken now to prepare individuals and businesses for when the UK formally leaves the EU.”

Louis, who is a Solicitor Advocate at Chattertons, recently had a notable success at an Immigration Tribunal where a couple had misunderstood rules surrounding the minimum income requirement and were refused an extension of their visa.

Louis said: “The couple were going through a period of extreme hardship due to illnesses affecting several members of the household.

“We took over the case, filed an appeal at the Tribunal on human rights grounds, and were able to convince the Tribunal Judge that it would be contrary to their human rights to cause the family to be separated by this visa refusal.

“The couple were able to remain in the UK and the family could stay together through this trying time.”