Apprentices help local community as they learn

All smiles at Caistor for apprentices Wesley Carlisle, left, and Callum Jackson, with centre manager Stephanie Dale EMN-150826-121927001
All smiles at Caistor for apprentices Wesley Carlisle, left, and Callum Jackson, with centre manager Stephanie Dale EMN-150826-121927001

Caistor’s successful Arts and Heritage Centre has teamed up with Grimsby Institute to help young people get a step on the work ladder.

Two apprentices can be seen beavering away at 28 Plough Hill making a difference both to their lives and to the local community.

One of those is 19-year-old Wesley Carlisle from Grasby, who has been taken on as an apprentice in business and administration.

“The vacancy is very local for me and I am very happy to be able to help in the local area,” he said, whose course will last 18 months.

“I am enjoying the job and learning as I go along.

“One of my parents works in the voluntary sector so we have common interests at home.

“The whole thing is really enjoyable and I am getting on well with the rest of the staff and centre manager Stephanie Dale but I think the good thing is that the whole process is a two-way one.”

The second apprentice, Callum Jackson, comes from Ashby-cum-Fenby and is undertaking an NVQ Level 2 in customer services.

He went to Caistor after the vacancy was brought to the attention of his mother who works in a Job centre.

“I heard what was on offer and thought I would give it a go,” said Callum, who has already completed his NVQ 3 in professional cookery.

“I am mainly cooking at the moment, which includes some washing up along with some general housekeeping.

“One of the good things is I will be learning things not being taught in college.”

And he has impressed his boss, chef Penny Finlay.

“He loves baking and is very pleased with his appointment,” said Penny.

“He has settled in well with the other staff members and he particularly enjoys the community involvement.”

Callum works Monday to Friday, but with the demands of the cafe some weekend working is factored into his contract.

“From a work point of view Penny (the centre’s chef) is good to work for and all the staff have been very good at helping me find my feet,” added Callum.

And while the two apprentices are enjoying learning in the workplace, the apprenticeship scheme is also reaping benefits for the Arts and Heritage Centre.

“This venture works well for us,” said Centre manager Stephanie Dale.

“It fits in nicely with our standing as a charity involved with the public and while the boys are working for qualifications which will benefit them, they are adding to their knowledge as well as doing a great job for us and the community.”