Caistor schools agree to sign up for challenges

All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-090005001
All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-090005001

Caistor’s three schools, along with Grasby Primary School, have started 2020 with a clear focus on the environment.

Following on from last term’s inaugural four schools’ meeting, students and pupils from across the age ranges came together once more to look at how they can work together on environmental issues.

All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-085953001

All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-085953001

Organised by Caistor Primary School teacher Nick McCann as part of the Caistor GO2 group, the main focus was ‘Education’.

Mr McCann said: “As Greta Thunberg said recently when asked what we can do about climate change, I’m not going to tell anyone what to do, but tell people to get educated, get the facts and understand for themselves.

“That is the aim with these meetings.

“The kids attending can then go out and be climate ambassadors and help others understand the issues and make their own informed choices.”

All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-085941001

All ages working together at the schools' environmental meetings EMN-200114-085941001

The afternoon, hosted by Caistor Grammar School, started with encouragement to take part in the upcoming Big Bird Watch and a mini quiz to help recognises garden birds and their sounds.

Then a video voiced by Sir David Attenborough explained some of the issues behind climate change.

The children then had to identify six issues and five ways to tackle them.

Mr McCann said: “We don’t want to frighten the children, but as the video says we have become a species out of balance with nature, and this is something that needs to be understood.

“People need to know the difference between weather and climate - we need to get educated.”

The final task of the afternoon was to look at how you can change someone else’s behaviour, and what can be done in schools to help encourage that behaviour change.

Mr McCann added: “The four challenges have been agreed and the schools are also being asked to consider taking part in the first GO2 Festival, which will be held in April.”

The students and pupils have agreed to go back to their schools and encourage people to work on four challenges.

GET PLANTING

Everyone can do their bit, especially when it comes to planting trees. There are a number of intitiatives people can find out more about, both locally and nationally.

Why not volunteer time to help local ‘greening’ projects.

CHANGE OUR DIETS

Can you persuade your school in some way to change its diet slightly, so it is not so reliant on meat? That is not to say everyone should be vegetarian or vegan. One of the young climate ambassadors has already looked at this with his family. They now have a meat free day every week.

Maybe a school could have a sponsored ‘no meat day’ and raise some money to use on another environmental project.

REWILD

A lot of natural habitats are being lost, with immaculate garden areas now being the norm.

Maybe schools could be persuaded to ‘rewild’ a small patch to encourage wildlife back in.

Why not also do it in your home garden?

BIG BIRD WATCH

Take part in - and encourage others to take part in - the Big Bird Watch, which takes place from January 25 to January 27.

Organised by the RSPB, the watch only involves one hour to see which species of bird frequent your garden.

To sign up and get lots of hints and tips, visit www.rspb.org.uk

In setting the challenges, Mr McCann said: “These are all small steps, but if everyone takes part it will be a big leap.

“We need to lead by example; it is important to show we are trying to do something.”