Rubbish in park puts boy in A&E

NO GO AREA: Ben Flear front with sisters Katie and Sophie, mum Sharon and friends Lorraine and Jack Bultitude.who no longer want to use Mill Road playpark
NO GO AREA: Ben Flear front with sisters Katie and Sophie, mum Sharon and friends Lorraine and Jack Bultitude.who no longer want to use Mill Road playpark
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A YOUNG Market Rasen family say they are too 
frightened to visit the town’s play park after a horrific accident last week

Nine-year-old Ben Flear slipped as he was coming off the rocking horse in Mill Road park and thought he had fallen on to a rock.

But as blood started to pour from his thigh, his mother realised it was something more serious.

“I was so shocked when I saw his leg,” said Sharon Flear.

“There was a serious gash in his thigh and blood was pouring out.”

Ben had actually landed on glass from broken bottles left under the play equipment and was rushed to Louth Hospital’s A & E.

After treatment, Ben was allowed home, but Sharon believes his leg will be scarred.

She said: “The gash is between three and four centimetres long, I’m sure it will leave a scar, but at least it is somewhere it can be covered - if it had been on his face it would have been awful.”

Ben is now recovering well from his ordeal, but neither he nor any of his friends want to go into the park again.

“I don’t want to play there any more - it makes me sad,” Ben said.

The family was part of a large group picnicking in the park after attending the More than Gold holiday club being held at the school next door.

“The children had done so well, we decided to treat them with a picnic in the park to round the day off, but it was totally spoilt,” said Sharon.

“You expect the park to be somewhere children can play safely; I just want other parents to be aware of the dangers here so no-one else is hurt and to highlight to the people leaving the broken glass the damage they can cause.”

Although bins are provided in the park, litter seems to be a constant problem.

“I realise the park can’t be monitored 24/7, but perhaps there could be a system put in place to check the site every morning,” said Sharon.

The park is owned and managed by the town council who perform regular litter picks at the site.

“There are generally two litter picks a week, but this was increased to four at the beginning of the holidays and then five times a week more recently,” a spokesman for the town council told the Mail.

l What do you think? Should further steps be taken to stop drinking in open spaces? If so how?

Email rasenmail@jpress.co.uk