Man disqualified from driving after high-speed police chase

Scales of Justice.

A Mablethorpe man has been banned from driving and ordered to take a driving test for what magistrates described as ‘borderline dangerous driving’ after being chased by police at speeds at up to twice the limit.

David Royston, 21, of Waterloo Road, admitted driving without due care and attention, failing to stop for the police and driving without insurance or a driving licence, when he appeared before magistrates in Boston.

Marie Stace, prosecuting, said that at 1.50am on October 3, police saw Royston driving a Ford Focus on the B1200 at Saltfleetby and followed him towards Mablethorpe.

She said Royston turned the car round but the officers continued to follow him as he drove through a 40mph speed limit area at 60mph and then ‘blue lighted’ him but he failed to stop.

She said the officers followed the car along the B1200 through Manby Middlegate, Little and Great Carlton and on the A1031 at speeds ranging from 50 to 65mph in areas with speed limits of 30 and 40mph.

She said that finally the car stopped suddenly and Royston and another man got out of the car but Royston was caught, still with the car keys in his possession.

In interview with the police, he said he had only bought the car a few days before and had no insurance or licence authorising him to drive it.

He told them he had been at a friend’s and had originally intended to get a taxi but decided to drive his car instead because he needed to get home as he was a carer for his mother.

He said he had panicked when the police ‘blue lighted’ him and admitted he had made a mistake.

Royston, who said he had only ever had one driving lesson, told the magistrates he ‘should have stopped’.

“It was silly. I had to be home in the morning for my mother,” he said.

The magistrates said the case was ‘bordering on dangerous driving’ and banned him from driving for 12 months and said he would have to take a driving test before he could drive again.

He was also ordered to pay fines, costs and charges totalling £355.

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