DCSIMG

Cecil’s long wait for medals finally over

Cecil Codd has received his war medals 68 years after being demobbed, thanks to his nephew Richard EMN-140520-062926001

Cecil Codd has received his war medals 68 years after being demobbed, thanks to his nephew Richard EMN-140520-062926001

An Osgodby man has finally received his war medals - 68 years after he was demobbed from his service in the Royal Navy.

Cecil Codd, 91, is now the proud owner of the Atlantic Star, the 1939-45 Star and 1939-45 War Medal, but it has taken an 18-month battle by his nephew, Richard Codd, and intervention from Sir Edward Leigh MP.

“It all started when I heard about the new Arctic Star medal,” explained Richard.

“I knew Uncle Cecil has served in the North Atlantic convoys, so applied on his behalf, but I was told he did not qualify as he had not gone inside the Arctic Circle itself.”

So Richard did more research and discovered Cecil was entitled to three medals, which he had never received.

“I applied for these medals, but was told they had been sent out in 1948 and they couldn’t replace them; they told me to contact a medal dealer to see if I could find any,” said Richard.

In fact, the medals had been sent to the temporary address Cecil had gone to when he was demobbed and even then, the authorities had misaddressed the package.

Richard decided to contact Cecil’s MP, Sir Edward Leigh, who agreed to send a letter to the Secretary of State on his behalf.

And less than two weeks later, the medals arrived.

“I am really pleased to be part of bringing these recognitions to Uncle Cecil and thank Edward Leigh very much for his support,” said Richard.

“What these people went through on the convoys is absolutely amazing.

“I am humbled Cecil is my uncle - he is a very brave man.”

And Sir Edward said he was pleased to be help bring this story to a happy conclusion.

“It is very good news that Mr Codd has now received his medals,” said Sir Edward.

“This is typical MOD bureaucratic farce. The medals had been sent to the wrong address in 1948 and they weren’t prepared to replace them.

“He obviously deserved them, so I was happy to help.”

As for Cecil, he has taken it all in his stride, although 
he admits he was a bit
emotional when the medals finally arrived.

“I was surprised when they finally turned up, I didn’t think I was going to get them,” he said.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page