Hitmaker honoured at former school in Rasen

Former pupils Stuart Brown, left, and James Dring unveiled the plaque to their fellow alumnus Rod Temperton EMN-170327-081046001
Former pupils Stuart Brown, left, and James Dring unveiled the plaque to their fellow alumnus Rod Temperton EMN-170327-081046001

A plaque has been unveiled at De Aston School to honour one of its most famous, yet least known students - songwriter Rod Temperton.

Never one to grab the limelight, he was known as ‘the Invisible Man’, but he penned some of Michael Jackson’s biggest hits , including Thriller.

The commemoratibve plaque made by the school's head of DT Chris Dickinson and his wife Liz EMN-170327-081102001

The commemoratibve plaque made by the school's head of DT Chris Dickinson and his wife Liz EMN-170327-081102001

It was former pupils Stuart Brown and James Dring who suggested a plaque be dedicated to Rod and they were delighted to see their idea come to fruition.

“It wasn’t common knowledge (about Temperton’s fame) when I was here, I didn’t really know anything until near the end of my time at school,” said Stuart, who attended De Aston from 1993 to 1995, and now runs a successful branding and marketing agency in the UK and Switzerland .

“I was a massive fan of Rod. He was at the top of his game, a real pioneer of the music business, but such a humble man.

“Of course, there is Bernie Taupin, Elton John’s songwriting partner, from Owmby by Spital too.

“It is crazy that we have these people from this area - is it something in the water?”

James Dring was also at De Aston in the 1990s.

He has followed the music path and is now, himself, an acclaimed music producer and songwriter.

It was the first time back at school for both of the former students and they spent the day catching up with their former teachers and working with current students in business studies and music.

The pair also judged a house music competition.

“There is a lot of talent here,” said James.

“We have genuinely been taken aback by what we have heard today.

“Most of them are better musicians than I am.”

The commemorative plaque to Rod Temperton, who died last year at the age of 66, was unveiled by Stuart and James in the school’s music block.

“It’s great for the kids; it shows they can achieve anything,” said James.

Stuart added: “The kids will know he came from this place; they will be aware of what he has done; they can be inspired by him and emulate his success.”