Entries now open for West Lindsey community awards

Samantha Coulam from Brookenby picks up her West Linidsey Citizen of the Year prize from Councillor Irmgard Parrott EMN-161102-152141001
Samantha Coulam from Brookenby picks up her West Linidsey Citizen of the Year prize from Councillor Irmgard Parrott EMN-161102-152141001
  • Market Rasen will host 2016 awards ceremony

West Lindsey’s Community Awards are back for a fifth year - and the competition is now open for entries.

The awards, launched by West Lindsey District Council in 2012, give special recognition to the area’s unsung heroes who do an amazing job working in the 
community.

Winners will be presented with their awards at a special ceremony on the evening of Thursday, April 28 at Market Rasen Festival 
Hall.

Residents are being asked to make their nominations if they know of someone who they think deserves recognition for their hard work in the 
district.

The deadline for suggestions is March 
1.

Chairman of West Lindsey District Council, Coun Angela Lawrence, said: “I am thrilled to be able to welcome back the community 
awards.

“As district councillors we come across so many people in the community who volunteer their time, support local town and parish councils and have a real passion for the places they live and 
work.

“A lot of the time the work goes unnoticed but the contribution is valued and this is an opportunity for us to celebrate their 
achievements.”

The categories are: District Champions Citizen of the Year, Parish/Town Council of the Year, Parish/Town Councillor of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Community Group of the Year 2016 and Chairman of the Council’s Special Award - this is chosen by WLDC chairman Angela 
Lawrence.

The winner of this award could be a nominee for another award or someone the chairman has met while on civic 
business.

In 2013 Brookenby mum-of-six Samantha Coulam was voted West Lindsey Citizen of the Year - and also named as Caistor Area 
Champion.

Having lived in Brookenby for nearly 15 years, Samantha said she began her community work when the village had a problem with getting the grass verges 
cut.

She then got involved in turning around the village’s failing community centre.

And she said her voluntary work then spiralled from there.