Businessman ignored laws despite warning

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A BUSINESSMAN repeatedly ignored strict countryside planning laws when he extended his waste management company, Lincoln Magistrates’ Court heard.

Owner of Lissington Waste Transfer Station, Clifford Page, 52, from Lissington did not comply with five Enforcement Notices.

The court heard how Page was given almost a year to carry out works to the site but an inspection in January 2011 revealed he had failed to do so.

This included works to the surface using appropriate soil, planting and seeding, anti-litter fencing, installation of a wheel cleaning facility for all vehicles leaving the site. He also failed to construct and layout the site as detailed in plans.

An application to extend Page’s waste transfer station was refused planning permission in 1999, but granted on appeal in 2000, subject to robust conditions as it is in the open countryside.

Page started development at the site before all the pre-development conditions were approved, apart from some planting and works to the access road.

In 2009 Page was given a warning to carry out the requirements but failed to do so. In January 2010 an Enforcement Notice was issued for Page to do the works that had previously been approved.

Chairman of Lincolnshire County Council’s planning and regulation committee coun Ian Fleetwood said: “Planning law is there to protect the amenity of Lincolnshire and its inhabitants.

“In this case Mr Page was given ample time to bring his site up to the required standards and comply with the enforcement notice. He chose not to.

“The clear message this prosecution sends to others who constantly break the regulations is that we will take robust action against those who persistently fail to comply with planning legislation.

“By contrast there are operators who are working hard to improve their sites and have made significant financial investment. We hope that this prosecution encourages all waste operators to do the same.”

Page was fined £3,000 and ordered to pay £3,204 in costs and a £15 surcharge.