Close up look at Rasen’s King Street over the years

Hazel Barnard and Frederick Rowlands are looking to document the heritage of King Street. EMN-170127-112939001
Hazel Barnard and Frederick Rowlands are looking to document the heritage of King Street. EMN-170127-112939001
  • Project could be expanded to cover the whole of Rasen

A new project is looking to document the heritage of Market Rasen’s King Street and will hopefully be the start of a whole-town plan.

Rase Heritage Society is looking to research King Street up to the 1901 census to see how it has evolved as part of the town.

Each of the 40 or so properties in that area will receive a letter over the next few weeks detailing the project.

“We are looking for the history of the property and land around; how they were used and who owned them over the years,” said Hazel Barnard, who is heading up the project along with fellow local history enthusiast Frederick Rowlands.

“It is a great project and I wish it was something we had done years ago,as properties change hands and important information can be lost.”

Over the past few years, Mr Rowlands has managed to get some information on the properties in that area of Market Rasen, but now this work will be formalised through the King Street project.

One of his key finds has been deeds going back to 1748 for the Sign of the Spread Eagle, which is today’s Red Lion pub.

“If people have the property’s Abstract of Title from 1836, there is a good chance it will go back 30, 40, 50 or even more years and so the document gives a lot of detail,” said Mr Rowlands.

“They are such an important document when it comes to heritage.”

The project will cover properties from the Catholic Church up to the Market Place.

Letters will be going out in batches of 10, starting this week and follow up visits are also planned.

“We will have ID with us to show we are who we say we are,” added Mrs Barnard.

“We hope people will be able to say who their land deeds are with and then we can go and look at them.

“Any costs in gaining access to deeds held by officially bodies will be met by the project and, at the end of it all, people can get their house history for free.”