The right location for stunning flower display

Demonstrator Sandra Meakin (right) from Melton Mowbray with Vice Chairman Angela Vora and Chairman Caroline Jackson.  (Lin)
Demonstrator Sandra Meakin (right) from Melton Mowbray with Vice Chairman Angela Vora and Chairman Caroline Jackson. (Lin)
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NOT only is Melton Mowbray famous for its pork pies, but also for florist Sandra Meakin, who was the guest demonstrator at Caistor and District Flower Club this month, when she delighted everyone with ‘Location, location’ arrangements.

Her first arrangement, ‘The log fire’ was an array of yellowy, orangey, fiery red flowers and foliage displayed in a circular shape, using roses, spiraea and beautiful peony tulips to finish the arrangement.

The second arrangement – ‘Going out for something to eat’ – was arranged in a long, slim basket, normally used to display French sticks. A horizontal creation, it had a combination of green foliage, euonymus, euphorbia and arum leaves. The flowers used were green spider chrysanthemums and carnations.

‘By the water’ came next, in a large, round, low container giving the effect of a pond. A mixture of ferns was used and blue delphiniums, their delicate buds and irises giving the feeling of a relaxed tranquil setting. You could just imagine a bright blue dragonfly hovering over the arrangement on a warm summer’s day.

A contemporary design entitled ‘Fashion’ was next, followed ‘Holiday’ and ‘Church Flowers’ – all spectacular.

Sandra wooed everyone with her anecdotes and tales of life, encouraging participation and dialogue; a wonderful evening was enjoyed by all.

The next meeting of the flower club will be in Caistor Town Hall on Wednesday, June 13, at 7.30pm, when the guest demonstrator will be Jan Travis with an evening of ‘This, that and a bit of TAT’.

Visitors are welcome at £5.

Schedules are now available for the club’s annual show on July 21, from Caroline on 07708 697860.

Tickets are also available for the day at a cost of £18, to include lunch and a demonstration by John Chennell.