Historical highlights

Maureen and Tom Glossop with Vice Chair of BASH Brian Denison (centre) before the talk on Brigg Fair.
Maureen and Tom Glossop with Vice Chair of BASH Brian Denison (centre) before the talk on Brigg Fair.
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The February meeting of BASH had a packed house to hear Tom Glossop’s popular talk on “The History of “Brigg Fair”.

He told of how a charter was laid down in 1204, by King John, to allow Brigg to hold a weekly market and a four day fair in July.

This was later changed, due to use of the Gregorian calendar, in the 1700s to August 5.

In the late 1800s, the Romany Gypsies started to come to the fair to trade horses; sheep were also sold at this fair.

Traditionally most of the selling of horses was done outside The White Horse pub in Wrawby Street, but this changed in the 1970s when it was moved to the old cattle market off Carey Lane.

By the 1980s, the fair had virtually died out, but in the 1990s a local group of people, headed by Tom Glossop, brought it back again.

Its peak was at its 800th anniversary in 2004, when many thousands of people visited.

After this the fair started to decline again, although the gypsies do still come to trade their horses and wares in Station Road.

Tom ended his talk by singing the famous folk song “Brigg Fair” to round off an excellent evening.